Wild-Caught Salmon Tacos

Wild-Caught Salmon tacos from the Seafood Chapter of the Taco Table Cookbook. Featured in this photo are wild-caught salmon tacos with a black bean salsa.

Wild-Caught Salmon Tacos

Wild salmon is among the healthiest types of fish to eat. It has a delicious, hearty flavor and pleasing flaky texture that works wonderfully when wrapped up in a tortilla. I like to serve these tacos with Black Bean Salsa.

Ingredients:

1 pound wild-caught salmon, skin removed and cut into 4 fillets
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper, ground
¾ teaspoon chipotle seasoning
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ lemon, juiced (approximately 1 tablespoon juice)
Corn or Flour Tortillas

Directions:

Combine salt, pepper, and chipotle in a mixing bowl. Coat one side of each salmon fillet.
In a cast-iron skillet or frying pan, heat the olive oil until hot but not smoking. Cook each fillet, spice side up, for 3 minutes or until it is brown on the underside. Turn over with a spatula and cook another 3 to 4 minutes until brown. Turn over again. Top with leftover spice mix. The topside should be nicely browned in appearance. Drizzle the lemon juice over the fillets, an even amount for each. Remove from heat and serve with your favorite tortillas and salsa.
Makes 4 tacos.

“Used with Permission. Excerpted from The Taco Table Cookbook, Published by Western National Parks Association, © By Lois Ellen Frank”

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Marinated Grilled Quail with Red Chile Honey Glaze!

Charbroiled Quail Glazed with Red Chile Honey

Marinated Grilled Quail with Red Chile Honey Glaze

This recipe is from one of our many wonderful cookbooks “Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations” by Lois Ellen Frank.

© By Lois Ellen Frank, Ph.D.
Excerpted from Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations published by Ten Speed Press

Wild game birds have been a part of the Southwest Indian diet for centuries.  Quail motifs can be found on pottery in both ancient and contemporary works. Animals were never hunted for sport and only what was needed, was killed.  This respect for the natural balance of things is a basic Native American creed.
Today game is hunted with the same spirit among most Native Americans. This contemporary recipe for quail is served glazed with a red chile honey which can be served individually as an appetizer or as a main course.

Marinade:
1 Tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
1 Tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped
1-teaspoon salt
1-teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons chipòtle chile powder
1 fresh Serrano Chile, seeded and finely chopped
1/2-cup olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tablespoon lemon peel zest

6 quail, backbone removed, or partially de-boned

Red Chile Honey Glaze:
4 Dried Red New Mexico Chiles, stemmed, seeded, and broken into small pieces
1/2-cup water
1/2 honey

Wash each quail under cold running water.  Cut the wings of each quail at their joints and set aside.

In a medium-size mixing bowl, combine together the ingredients for the marinade.  Add the quail, making sure each quail is thoroughly coated.  Cover and place in the refrigerator, and let marinade overnight.

For the glaze, in a small saucepan heat together the dried red chiles and water over high heat.  Bring to a boil and boil for 3 minutes, then remove from the heat.  Let stand 10 minutes, place the mixture into a blender, and add the honey and blend for 1 minute.
Pour through a fine sieve, to remove the chile skins, and then discard them.  Set aside.
Heat a grill or cast iron grill pan over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking, then place on the marinated quail.  Grill for approximately 5 minutes, turn over and grill another 5 minutes, then remove from the heat.

Brush the glaze onto both sides of each grilled quail.  Reserve the remaining glaze for serving.  Place the quail topside up in a shallow roasting pan and then place them in the oven at 350 degrees. Cook until done, approximately 15 to 20 minutes or until done.

Serve each quail on a bed of sautéed greens and a starch such as the wild rice sauté and serve with the remaining glaze.
Serves 6

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“Used with Permission. Excerpted from Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations, Published by Ten Speed Press, © By Lois Ellen Frank”

© By Lois Ellen Frank

Bison Meat Navajo Indian Tacos!

This recipe is from one of our many wonderful cookbooks “Taco Table” by Lois Ellen Frank.

This recipe is a variation on the famous Indian tacos that are served at many ceremonial powwows, arts and craft festivals, rodeos, and Pueblo feasts. Walter Whitewater, a Diné (Navajo) chef, and I came up with this delicious Indian taco variation. We make our fry bread taco bottoms smaller and create a healthy topping for the taco with organically raised bison meat, organic cooked pinto and kidney beans, local organic baby lettuce greens, heirloom tomatoes, and avocado.  © Lois Ellen Frank

Bison Meat Navajo Indian Tacos from the Meat Chapter of the Taco Table Cookbook. Featured in this photo is a bison meat Indian taco featuring organically raised local bison with organic beans, green chile, cheese, lettuce, tomato on a piece of homemade fry bread.
Bison Meat Navajo Indian Tacos from the Meat Chapter of the Taco Table Cookbook. Featured in this photo is a bison meat Indian taco featuring organically raised local bison with organic beans, green chile, cheese, lettuce, tomato on a piece of homemade fry bread.

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